The next MacBook Pros can pair Apple silicon with 64GB of RAM


A 16GB memory ceiling and two Thunderbolt ports are available M1 -based Macs left pro users more of a bit of a worry in the end systems that are much higher end can be found compared to their Intel counterparts? Fortunately, the answer may be “no.” Bloomberg origins claim the rumored The design of the MacBook Pro as well and a taller Mac mini will use chips that will not only “outperform” the performance of the M1, but will come with up to 64GB of RAM and four Thunderbolt ports. That’s no different there are Intel models, but it should still be a relief if you intend to push the future Apple Silicon laptop to its limits.

The features, dubbed Jade C-Chop and Jade C-Die, will reportedly include eight high-performance cores and two low-power cores, with 16- or 32-core GPUs. You’ll also find an “improved” Neural Engine for AI tasks, according to tipsters. The M1 now comes with four high-speed cores, four low-power cores and no more than an eight-core GPU.

Past rumors have a new shipment of MacBook Pros with 14- and 16-inch screens fitted with a new chassis that brings back MagSafe, HDMI and an SD card slot. Data were released as part of a Ransomware attack on an Apple supplier shows schemas of a MacBook Pro with these ports.

The new MacBook Pros will debut first summer.

The detected leak also provides an updated roadmap for other Macs. You’ll see a “revamped” MacBook Air at the end of 2021 that will have a true successor to the M1 with the same number of cores, but better performance with a nine or 10-core GPU. The low-end MacBook Pro will get the chip as well. A “new” Mac Pro won’t be necessary until 2022, but it will come in 20- or 40-core versions (four or eight of those at low power) and any 64- or 128-core GPUs.

It shouldn’t make you happy if you’re hoping for a larger memory cap or discrete non-Apple graphics. If the leak is true, however, Apple clearly knows that many of its users won’t upgrade until it exceeds the limitations of the M1 hardware.

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